• Review, Linux E-Mail,set up, maintain, and secure a small office e-mail server

    (this is a review that i originally posted somewhere on Slashdot, IIRC) Linux E-mail, Second Edition is a book written for Packt Publishing by I. Haycox, A. McDonald, M. Back, R. Hildebrandt, P.B.Koetter, D. Rusenko and C. Taylor. Linux E-mail containsall the information you need to handle all email services for a small organization on your own Linux server: send and receive messages, provide access to email accounts from any web browser, block as much viruses and spam as possible, possibly before they even enter your server, backup all email and configuration data in the most effective way and, finally, configuration of some email clients.
  • MCG, the eMail Configuration Generator for procmail and mutt

    Many U*nix users with advanced email needs, a high load of email, and possibly a lot of addresses to keep separated, invariably come to procmail and to Mutt (but the MCG concept can be easily adapted to other MUAs: read on). Procmail and Mutt are so flexible and powerful to allow a total customization of email management, whatever your particular needs are, and they automatize many tasks. Furthermore, they are much less resource hungry than many other solution with the same power and flexibility (do they exist?
  • How to extract email headers and store them in a cache file

    note: I am trying to publish, a piece at a time a lots of tricks that I use in my email management system, in such a format that each of them is usable separately. This is why it may be a bit difficult to understand certain parts of this and other pages, until I have published all of them. In the meantime, please let me know about anything you find not clear in these pages, so I can improve them, and read this article of mine on how to Build your own email server with Postfix, because it is a good synthesis of the whole picture
  • How to ignore uninteresting threads in mailing lists

    Even in this age of social networking and instant messaging, mailing lists are very useful tools to get technical support or carry on public discussions online. The problem with mailing list is that, especially when they are very popular, you will soon find out that most of the traffic is irrelevant, because it’s either some flame war or some topic that has no interest for you. This kind of email traffic is a big problem for two reasons: